Office Staff: Home Showing Pros?

can office staff show a home for a relator

The role of office staff in the real estate industry varies depending on the state and whether they are licensed or unlicensed. Unlicensed assistants are generally restricted from performing activities that require a real estate license, such as showing properties, negotiating contracts, and discussing contract terms with clients. Licensed real estate agents, on the other hand, are responsible for showing homes and communicating with clients. They can work from anywhere, including from home or in an office. Working from an office provides a set quitting time and a professional environment to direct client calls.

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In some states, office staff are not allowed to show a home for a realtor

For example, in Alabama, unlicensed assistants can only perform general clerical or administrative duties for the licensed broker. They are not permitted to prepare or discuss listing agreements, show any property, drive or accompany a prospect to a property, or negotiate any terms of a sale.

In Arizona, unlicensed assistants are allowed to assist at an open house as long as a licensee is present. They can also unlock a home for a licensee to show a client, but they cannot discuss the property.

In Arkansas, unlicensed assistants may only be employed at a salaried or hourly rate and can only perform certain functions, such as delivering or receiving lease applications and rental payments, and showing rental units to potential tenants.

Colorado allows unlicensed assistants to provide access to a property and conduct showings or open houses, but only if they are authorized to do so by the seller.

In Connecticut, unlicensed assistants are not allowed to host open houses or answer any questions from consumers on listings, financing, closing, etc. They can, however, schedule appointments for licensees to show listed properties.

These are just a few examples of the regulations that vary from state to state regarding what unlicensed assistants can and cannot do in the real estate industry. It is important for individuals in this industry to be aware of the specific rules and regulations in their state to ensure compliance and avoid any legal issues.

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In some states, office staff can unlock a property for a realtor to show

In Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, office staff can unlock a property for a realtor to show.

In Colorado, an office worker can only unlock a property if they are supervised by a licensee. In New York, an office worker can unlock a property if they are supervised by a licensee and the licensee is present.

In Vermont, office staff cannot unlock a property for a realtor to show.

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In some states, office staff can accompany a realtor to a showing for security purposes

In Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin, unlicensed assistants are prohibited from showing properties.

However, in some states, such as Georgia, Idaho, and Massachusetts, unlicensed assistants are permitted to accompany a licensed realtor to a showing for security purposes only. In these cases, the unlicensed assistant cannot discuss or provide information about the property beyond what is included in pre-printed materials.

Some realtors and buyers also prefer that the listing agent be present at a showing. This can be beneficial as the listing agent can answer any questions about the property and provide additional information. It can also add an extra layer of security, although this is not a common concern.

On the other hand, having the listing agent present at a showing can also have some drawbacks. It can make scheduling more difficult, as it requires coordinating the schedules of the buyer, buyer's agent, listing agent, and seller. It can also make buyers feel uncomfortable, as they may not feel free to discuss the property with their agent or examine it closely.

Ultimately, the decision of whether to have the listing agent present at a showing depends on the specific situation and the preferences of those involved.

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In some states, office staff can hand out pre-printed materials at an open house

Alabama

Unlicensed office staff in Alabama can perform general clerical or administrative duties, such as answering phones, taking messages, making appointments, and delivering information and forms. They are prohibited from showing any property or being present at an open house.

Alaska

In Alaska, unlicensed staff can perform administrative, bookkeeping, clerical, and maintenance tasks. They can answer phones, schedule appointments, obtain public information, place or remove signs, and draft advertising copy. However, they are not allowed to host an open house, assist in procuring prospective buyers, or communicate with prospective buyers.

Arizona

In Arizona, unlicensed assistants can perform clerical and administrative tasks, prepare marketing materials, deliver documents, and assist at an open house with a licensee present. They are not permitted to hold or host an open house without a licensee being present.

Arkansas

Arkansas allows unlicensed assistants to perform specific functions, such as delivering lease applications, receiving security deposits and rental payments, showing rental units to potential tenants, and conveying information about leases. They are not authorized to engage in any activities that require a real estate license.

California

Unlicensed assistants in California can assist licensees at an open house by placing signs, greeting the public, and providing factual information. They can also prepare and design advertising materials and schedule appointments. However, they are prohibited from showing property, discussing terms and conditions, or engaging in activities that require a real estate license.

Connecticut

Connecticut allows unlicensed assistants to answer phones, transmit listings, follow up on loan commitments, assemble documents, secure public information, and perform other clerical duties. They are not permitted to host open houses, answer questions about listings, or discuss real estate documents with anyone outside the firm.

Delaware

In Delaware, unlicensed staff can assist licensees at an open house by handing out pre-printed materials, but they are not allowed to answer any questions concerning the property.

Florida

Unlicensed assistants in Florida can answer phones, submit listings, follow up on loan commitments, assemble documents, secure public information, write and place ads, and perform other clerical tasks. They are prohibited from hosting open houses, answering questions about listings or real estate documents, or negotiating commission splits.

Georgia

Georgia allows unlicensed support personnel to answer phones, submit listings, follow up on loan commitments, gather documents for closing, create ads and promotional materials, receive and deposit funds, fill in contract forms, schedule appointments, and perform maintenance work. They are not permitted to host open houses, prepare promotional materials without the review of a licensee, answer questions about listings or real estate documents, or discuss the attributes of a property.

Hawaii

Unlicensed assistants in Hawaii are prohibited from showing properties, engaging in real estate negotiations, answering questions beyond what is provided in pre-printed fact sheets, signing real estate documents, and managing properties for more than one owner.

Idaho

Idaho allows unlicensed assistants to perform clerical duties, provide access to properties for contractors and inspectors (but not potential buyers), hand out pre-printed information, deliver paperwork, prepare market analyses, and answer simple questions about listed properties using pre-approved information. They are not authorized to show properties or engage in any activities that require a real estate license.

Illinois

In Illinois, unlicensed assistants cannot host open houses, interpret information on listings or real estate documents, negotiate commission splits, or perform any other activities that require a real estate license.

The list goes on, but these examples illustrate the varying rules and regulations regarding the role of unlicensed office staff during an open house across different states. It's important to consult the specific regulations in your state to ensure compliance and avoid any legal issues.

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In some states, office staff can schedule appointments for a realtor to show a listed property

For example, in Alabama, unlicensed assistants can answer phones, forward calls, take messages, and make appointments for licensees. In Arizona, unlicensed assistants can set or confirm appointments for a licensee to show a listed property, but they cannot hold an open house without a licensee being present. In California, unlicensed assistants can make or schedule appointments for licensees to meet with a party to the transaction, but they cannot show or exhibit property. In Connecticut, unlicensed assistants can schedule appointments for a licensee to show a listed property, but they cannot host an open house or answer any questions from consumers on the listing. In Delaware, unlicensed assistants can schedule appointments, but only a licensee may host an open house or otherwise show a property listed for sale.

These are just a few examples, but it's important to note that the rules and regulations regarding the activities of unlicensed assistants can vary from state to state, so it's always a good idea to check the specific regulations in your state.

Frequently asked questions

No, office staff cannot show a home for a realtor. Only licensed realtors can show a property to prospective buyers.

Yes, an unlicensed assistant can accompany a licensed realtor to a showing, but they cannot answer any questions about the property or discuss any terms or conditions of the sale.

Yes, an unlicensed assistant can be present at an open house, but they cannot answer any questions about the property or hand out any materials.

Yes, an unlicensed assistant can perform certain tasks related to the sale of a property, such as scheduling appointments, placing signs on the property, and preparing marketing materials. However, they cannot perform any tasks that require a real estate license, such as negotiating contracts or discussing the terms of a sale.

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