Dvla And Home Office: Data Sharing?

does dvla share information with home office

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and the Home Office have been known to work together to revoke driving licences. The Home Office is the UK government department responsible for immigration, cutting crime, security and counter-terrorism. The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport and is responsible for driver licensing in Great Britain, vehicle tax collection and enforcement, and registering vehicle keepers in the UK.

The Home Office regularly shares information with the DVLA, which is then compared with the data held in its database. The DVLA then provides a result to the Home Office to decide whether further action is necessary.

The DVLA also shares information with third parties to prevent fraud and protect identities.

Characteristics Values
Does the DVLA share information with the Home Office? Yes
What information does the DVLA share with the Home Office? A result to allow the Home Office to decide whether further action is necessary
What is the purpose of the information sharing? Immigration enforcement
What is the legal basis for the information sharing? Data protection legislation, including the Data Protection Act 2018 and the UK General Data Protection Regulation
How often does the information sharing occur? In a six-month period from August 1, 2016, to January 31, 2017, such information was processed on 54,874 occasions
What are the consequences of the information sharing? Revocation of driving licenses and British citizenship

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The Home Office and DVLA share information to revoke driving licences

The Home Office and the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) work closely together to revoke driving licences. The Home Office notifies the DVLA when someone is living in the UK illegally or is deprived of their British citizenship. The DVLA then sends a letter to the individual, informing them of the intention to revoke their driving licence in pursuance of Section 99(3) of the Road Traffic Act 1998, 28 days from the date of the letter. If the individual does not contact the DVLA within 28 days, their entitlement to drive is revoked, and their details are added to the Police National Computer.

The DVLA's power to revoke driving licences was introduced in July 2014 by the UK Immigration Act 2014, which created a "hostile environment" for migrants in the UK. This act also introduced Right to Rent checks by landlords and a "health surcharge" for migrants using the NHS.

The DVLA has seen an increase in the number of UK citizenship deprivation cases, including many Albanian nationals who obtained refugee status and citizenship based on an Asylum claim of Kosovan nationality. As a driving licence is a commonly used form of ID, its revocation can cause problems for individuals in their day-to-day activities, such as securing employment.

The Home Office can revoke British citizenship if the loss of citizenship is deemed conducive to the public good and would not make the person stateless. Additionally, if a citizen obtained British citizenship through registration or naturalisation by means of fraud, false representation, or concealment of a material fact, the Home Secretary has the power to deprive them of their citizenship, even if it would render them stateless.

Individuals can challenge or appeal against the decision to revoke their British citizenship by making an appeal to the First Tier Tribunal (Immigration & Asylum Chamber) based on the legality and merits of the decision.

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The Home Office can request information from the DVLA for immigration enforcement purposes

The Home Office can request information from the DVLA under data protection legislation, which includes the Data Protection Act 2018 and the UK General Data Protection Regulation. The DVLA also aims to comply with all applicable data protection laws when processing personal information.

The Home Office may request information from third parties for various purposes, including verifying information provided in support of an application, obtaining information for a safeguarding purpose, or obtaining new address details of individuals they are trying to trace. The DVLA is listed as one of the government departments from which the Home Office may obtain information.

The DVLA has confirmed that it provides information to the Home Office to allow them to decide whether further action is necessary for immigration enforcement. Between August 1, 2016, and January 31, 2017, the DVLA processed such requests on 54,874 occasions.

In addition, the DVLA may share information with the Home Office when verifying an individual's identity. For example, when an individual uses their National Insurance number or UK passport number to access DVLA services, the DVLA will contact the Home Office to help confirm their identity.

Furthermore, the DVLA may share information with the Home Office regarding the revocation of driving licenses for individuals facing revocation of their British citizenship. The Home Office notifies the DVLA of individuals being deprived of their British citizenship, and the DVLA then sends a letter confirming the revocation of the individual's driving license within 28 days.

Overall, the Home Office can request and obtain information from the DVLA for immigration enforcement purposes, adhering to relevant data protection laws and guidelines.

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The DVLA shares information with the Home Office to help verify identity

The Home Office sometimes needs to process personal information to carry out its functions, including investigating offences, preventing and detecting crime, maintaining border security, and controlling immigration. To do this, it may request information from third parties, including the DVLA.

The DVLA, in turn, collects information for several purposes, including when individuals apply for a driving licence, register a vehicle, or contact the DVLA about a query or complaint. The DVLA may share individuals' personal information with other government departments, law enforcement bodies, and foreign authorities, when necessary and lawful to do so.

In the context of verifying identity, the DVLA and the Home Office have worked together to revoke the driving licences of individuals who have received notice of British citizenship deprivation. In such cases, the Home Office notifies the DVLA, which then sends a letter to the individual confirming the revocation of their driving licence.

Additionally, when individuals open a Driver and Vehicles account, the DVLA may need to verify their identity. While this usually involves checking the individual's name, address, date of birth, and GB driving licence number, in some cases, the DVLA may contact the Home Office to help confirm the identity of individuals who use their non-UK passport, European national identity card, Biometric Residence Permit, or Biometric Residence Card.

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The Home Office shares information with the DVLA for the DVLA's online services

The Home Office and the DVLA share information with each other for various purposes, including immigration enforcement and the provision of online services.

The Home Office is the UK government department responsible for areas such as immigration, crime reduction, security, and counter-terrorism. It collects and processes personal information to carry out its functions and comply with relevant laws and regulations. This includes information related to investigating offences, preventing and detecting crime, maintaining border security, and considering applications for visas and citizenship.

The DVLA, on the other hand, is an executive agency of the Department for Transport. It is responsible for driver licensing, vehicle tax collection and enforcement, and registering vehicle keepers in the UK. The DVLA holds a significant amount of personal data, including over 50 million driver records and 40 million vehicle records.

In terms of information sharing between the two organisations, the Home Office may request information from the DVLA for various purposes, including verifying information provided by individuals in their applications or for safeguarding purposes. This is done in accordance with data protection legislation and other relevant laws.

Additionally, the DVLA may share personal information with the Home Office for immigration enforcement purposes. For example, the DVLA has confirmed that it provides the Home Office with information to allow them to decide whether further action is necessary regarding immigration matters. This information sharing has resulted in a significant number of cases being processed over a six-month period.

Moreover, the DVLA's online services, such as the "View your Driving Licence Information" service, require users to verify their identities. As part of this process, the DVLA may contact the Home Office to help confirm the identity of individuals who provide their non-UK passports, European national identity cards, Biometric Residence Permits, or Biometric Residence Cards. This information sharing ensures the security and integrity of the DVLA's online services.

It is important to note that both organisations are subject to data protection laws and are committed to safeguarding personal information. Individuals have the right to access their personal data and can make subject access requests to obtain information held about them.

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The DVLA shares information with the Home Office for the Home Office's immigration enforcement purposes

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) shares information with the Home Office for immigration enforcement purposes. The Home Office is the UK government department responsible for immigration, cutting crime, security, and counter-terrorism.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport and is responsible for driver licensing in Great Britain, vehicle tax collection and enforcement, and registering vehicle keepers in the UK. The DVLA holds over 50 million driver records and 40 million vehicle records.

The DVLA collects information for several purposes, including when individuals apply for a driving licence, register a vehicle, or pay the HGV levy. The DVLA may share this personal information with other government departments, police and enforcement bodies, prosecution authorities, and law enforcement agencies.

In the context of immigration enforcement, the DVLA has confirmed that it provides information to the Home Office to allow them to decide whether further action is necessary. For example, the DVLA may share data on driving licence holders or applicants with the Home Office. This information-sharing arrangement has resulted in individuals being picked up for deportation.

Between August 1, 2016, and January 31, 2017, the DVLA processed information for the Home Office's immigration enforcement purposes on 54,874 occasions. This collaboration between the DVLA and the Home Office has led to the revocation of driving licences for individuals facing the loss of their British citizenship. Once the Home Office notifies the DVLA of an individual's deprivation of citizenship, the DVLA will send a letter confirming the revocation of their driving licence within 28 days.

The DVLA's information-sharing practices with the Home Office are in accordance with data protection and other relevant laws, such as the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Immigration Act 2014.

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Frequently asked questions

Yes, the DVLA shares information with the Home Office. The Home Office may request information from third parties, including the DVLA, for the purposes of verifying information supplied in support of an application, obtaining information needed for a safeguarding purpose, obtaining new address details of people they are trying to trace, or undertaking other enforcement actions.

The DVLA may share information from your driving licence record with third parties where necessary, and when the law allows it. This includes doctors, registered healthcare professionals, optometrists or other eye care professionals, driving assessors, and members of the Department for Transport's Medical Advisory Panels. The DVLA will only share the minimum data needed to assess your medical fitness to drive.

Once the Home Office notifies the DVLA that somebody is being deprived of their British Citizenship, that person will receive a letter from the DVLA confirming that their licence is being revoked within 28 days of the letter.

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