The Traditional House Coal

what is traditional house coal

Traditional house coal is a naturally occurring bituminous coal that has been used in the United Kingdom for decades. It is a popular coal for use on open fires and some coal-burning appliances. Traditional house coal is easy to light and burns with a long and strong flame. It has a low ash content, making it relatively easy to clean up after use. However, it is not suitable for burning in smoke-controlled areas.

Characteristics Values
Use Open fires, coal-burning appliances
Ease of lighting Easy to light
Burn Long, strong flame
Ash content Low
Clean-up Easy
Suitability for smoke control areas Not suitable

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Traditional house coal is a natural product

Traditional house coal comes in different grades, each offering varying degrees of heat, burn time, and residual ash produced. The standard grade provides good heat output and burns for a long time with an attractive flame, making it ideal for cosy nights at home. There are also larger pieces called "doubles" that burn with the same heat, flame, and duration as the standard grade. For those seeking even higher heat output and longer burn times, there is a Five Star grade that produces less residual ash.

The size of the coal pieces also varies, with "doubles" being slightly bigger than standard coal, and "trebles" being larger than "nuts," which are considered a good all-round size. The larger sizes, such as "trebles," burn for longer but may be more challenging to light due to their greater size and volume. Traditional house coal is typically sold in 25kg or 50kg bags, and it is important to note that it is not suitable for burning in smoke-controlled areas.

Overall, traditional house coal is a natural fuel source that has been relied upon for generations in the UK to provide warmth and comfort during cold winters. Its ease of use, longevity, and attractive flame make it a popular choice for those with open fires or compatible appliances.

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It is easy to light

Traditional house coal is a popular choice for open fires and some coal-burning appliances. One of its key advantages is that it is easy to light.

To light a traditional house coal fire, you will need firelighters, dry kindling wood, and good-quality coal or smokeless coal. Firstly, place 2-3 firelighters onto the firebed. Then, add the kindling on top, leaving plenty of air gaps. Light the firelighters from underneath the kindling. Once the firelighters are lit, add a few more pieces of kindling to build the heat. At this point, you can start to add a generous amount of smokeless coal on top of the fire, ensuring that all the kindling is covered. Give the fire enough time to grow and for the coal to catch light.

Traditional house coal is easy to light and, once ignited, burns with a long and strong flame. It has a low ash content, making it relatively easy to clean up afterward.

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It burns with a long, strong, and attractive flame

Traditional house coal is a popular fuel choice for open fires and some coal-burning appliances. It has been used in the United Kingdom for decades, providing warmth for homes and businesses even during the coldest winters. One of the reasons for its popularity is that it is easy to light and burns with a long, strong, and attractive flame.

The flame produced by traditional house coal is not only long-lasting and robust but also visually appealing. The attractive flame adds to the cosiness and ambiance of a room, making it perfect for those seeking a warm and inviting atmosphere. Whether it's a chilly winter evening or a cosy night in, traditional house coal creates a delightful setting.

The long-burning duration of traditional house coal is a significant advantage. Once lit, it provides sustained heat over an extended period, making it an economical and cost-effective choice for those seeking a long-lasting heat source. The strength of the flame also contributes to its effectiveness in heating spaces, ensuring a warm and comfortable environment.

The attractive flame produced by traditional house coal is a result of its natural bituminous composition. This type of coal has been a popular choice for open fires and home heating appliances for generations. While traditional house coal offers a classic and visually pleasing flame, it is important to note that it is not suitable for burning in smoke-controlled zones or areas. For such locations, smokeless coal alternatives are recommended.

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It is not suitable for burning in smoke control areas

Traditional house coal is a naturally bituminous coal with a traditional appearance. It is popular in open fires and home heating appliances. It is easy to light and burns with a long, strong, attractive flame. However, it is not suitable for burning in smoke control areas.

Smoke control areas are zones throughout the UK where emitting smoke from a chimney is prohibited. These areas are designated by local authorities to help cut down on harmful emissions. As such, only authorised smokeless fuels can be burned in these areas. Traditional house coal is not authorised and is, therefore, prohibited.

Traditional house coal is a natural product, but it produces smoke and harmful emissions. Smokeless coal, on the other hand, is formed from an anthracite base with fewer volatile components, meaning it burns without emitting as much smoke – around 80% less than traditional coal. Smokeless coal burns hotter and longer than traditional coal, giving you 5-6 hours of burn time and an extremely high heat output.

If you live in a smoke control area, you must use a smokeless fuel such as anthracite or another authorised smokeless fuel. These smokeless fuels produce less harmful emissions and are, therefore, better for your health and the environment. They are also more efficient, producing more heat with less fuel.

By switching to smokeless coal, you can reduce your carbon footprint and improve the air quality in your home and community. It is important to follow the regulations in your area and choose the right fuel for your stove or fireplace to stay compliant and avoid any fines.

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It is sourced from UK mines

Traditional house coal is a naturally bituminous coal with a traditional appearance. It is sourced from UK mines, with coalfields in Northumberland and Durham, North and South Wales, Yorkshire, the Scottish Central Belt, Lancashire, Cumbria, the East and West Midlands, and Kent.

Coal mining in the UK dates back to Roman times and occurred in many different parts of the country. Coal was widely used for domestic heating in the 19th century due to its low cost and widespread availability. The consumption of coal, mostly for electricity, fell from 157 million tonnes in 1970 to 18 million tonnes in 2016.

The last deep coal mine in the UK closed in 2015, and the consumption of coal has continued to decline. However, there are still some open-cast mines in operation, and the UK has identified hard coal resources of 3.56 billion tonnes, with total remaining coal resources estimated to be as large as 187 billion tonnes.

Traditional house coal is easy to light and burns with a long, strong flame, making it a popular choice for open fires and some coal-burning appliances. It is important to note that traditional house coal is not suitable for burning in Smoke Control zones, and smokeless fuel alternatives are available.

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Frequently asked questions

Traditional house coal is a classic fuel used for open fires and certain coal-burning appliances. It is easy to light and burns with a long and strong flame.

There are different grades of traditional house coal, including standard, doubles, premium, and trebles. The grades differ in the size of the coal pieces, heat output, burn time, and amount of residual ash produced.

Traditional house coal can be purchased from various suppliers, including Paul Rogers & Sons Coal Merchants, Dandy's Topsoil & Landscape Supplies, and Coal Hut.

No, traditional house coal is not suitable for burning in smoke-controlled areas or zones. If you live in a smoke-controlled area, you should opt for smokeless fuels instead.

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